The climate is changing: the Arctic Dipole emerges

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:53 PM GMT on December 11, 2009

Share this Blog
8
+

The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice in recent years has created a fundamental new change in the atmospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere that has sped up sea ice loss and is affecting fall and winter weather across most of the Northern Hemisphere, according to several recent studies. Arctic sea ice loss peaks in September and October, exposing a large area of open water that heats the air above it. This extra heat has helped drive September - November air temperatures in the Arctic to 1°C (1.8°F) or more above average over about half of the depth of the lower atmosphere (Figure 1). This deep layer of warm air has grown less dense and expanded, pushing the top of the troposphere (the lower atmosphere) higher. The result has been a decrease in the pressure gradient (the difference in pressure) between the North Pole and mid-latitudes. With not as much difference in pressure to try and equalize, the jet stream has slowed down in the Arctic, creating a major change in the atmospheric circulation for the Northern Hemisphere.


Figure 1. Cross section of Arctic temperature anomaly from 1000 mb (the surface) to 300 mb (roughly, the height of the top of the lower atmosphere or troposphere). Cross section is taken along the Date Line (180°W), from 60°N latitude (left side) to the North Pole (right side), for September - November for the 12-year period 1998 - 2009. Three year averages were done to reduce the amount of year-to-year noise associated with natural variation. Other cross sections along different lines of longitude show similar results, though typically with more warming aloft and less warming at the surface. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL.

A new atmospheric pattern emerges: the Arctic Dipole
In a 2008 article titled, Recent radical shifts of atmospheric circulations and rapid changes in Arctic climate system Zhang et al. show that the extreme loss of Arctic sea ice since 2001 has been accompanied by a radical shift of the Arctic atmospheric circulation patterns, into a new mode they call the Arctic Rapid change Pattern. The new atmospheric circulation pattern has also been recognized by other researchers, who refer to it as the Arctic Dipole (Richter-Menge et al., 2009). The old atmospheric patterns that controlled Arctic weather--the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO), which featured air flow that tended to circle the pole, now alternate with the new Arctic Dipole pattern. The Arctic Dipole pattern features anomalous high pressure on the North American side of the Arctic, and low pressure on the Eurasian side. This results in winds blowing more from south to north, increasing transport of heat into the central Arctic Ocean. The Arctic Dipole pattern occurred in all summer months of 2007 and helped support the record 2007 summer reduction in sea ice extent (Overland et al., 2008). Overland et al., 2010 also found that the Arctic Dipole pattern tended to create an increase in easterly winds in the lower half of the atmosphere of 40% in fall, between 2002 - 2008. Fall 2008 through spring 2009 featured the old AO pattern. The new Arctic Dipole pattern re-appeared in June - July 2009, but the old AO pattern dominated in August - September, resulting in greater sea ice extent than in 2007 and 2008. The Arctic Dipole pattern was active again in October, inactive in November, and reasserted itself this December. As a result, Arctic sea ice reached a new record minimum for a 10-day period in early November, increased above record lows during late November and early December, and appears poised again to reach a new record minimum later this December (Figure 2).


Figure 2. Sea ice extent in the Arctic for this year (blue line) compared to the record low year of 2007 (green line) and 1979 - 2000 average (gray line). One could make the ice loss looks less significant by using the full satellite data record from 1979 - 2008 for the average. Image credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Arctic Dipole blamed for colder winters in East Asia
It turns out that the new Arctic circulation patterns help to intensify the Siberian High, a large semi-permanent region of surface high pressure prevalent in winter over Siberia. According to Honda et al. (2009), this results in increased flow of cold air out of the Arctic in early winter over eastern Russia, Japan, Korea, and eastern China, causing colder temperatures. By late winter, the pattern shifts, resulting in colder than average temperatures from East Asia to Europe.

Arctic Dipole blamed for drier winters in Northern Europe
Francis et al. (2009) found that during 1979 - 2006, years that had unusually low summertime Arctic sea had a 10 - 20% reduction in the temperature difference between the Equator and North Pole. This resulted in a weaker jet stream with slower winds that lasted a full six months, through fall and winter. The weaker jet caused a weaker Aleutian Low and Icelandic Low during the winter, resulting in a more negative North Atlantic Oscillation--a pattern that usually brings reduced winter precipitation over Alaska and Northern Europe and increased precipitation over Southern Europe. A more negative NAO also tends to bring cold winters to eastern North America and Europe. Though it was not mentioned in the article, reduced Arctic sea ice may also cause dry early winter conditions in the U.S. and the Caribbean (Figure 3). The authors noted that strong La Niña or El Niño events can have a much larger influence on the wintertime atmospheric circulation, which will overshadow the changes due to Arctic sea ice loss.


Figure 3. Difference in early winter precipitation (November - January) between five years that had low Arctic sea ice (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009), and five years that had unusually high Arctic sea ice extent (1981, 1984, 1986, 1989, 1993). Note that low sea ice may be responsible for dry conditions in early winter for the Caribbean and most of the U.S.

Commentary
Arctic sea ice loss appears to have created a new atmospheric circulation pattern that brings more warm air in the Arctic, creating a positive feedback loop that causes even more sea ice loss. This feedback loop increases the likelihood that an ice-free Arctic in the summer will indeed come by 2030, as many Arctic experts are predicting. It's worth noting that such an atmospheric circulation shift was not predicted by the climate models. Indeed, the loss of Arctic sea ice over the past three years exceeds what any of our models were predicting (Figure 4). While we can rightly criticize these models for their inaccuracy, we should realize that they are just as capable of making errors not in our favor as they are of making errors in our favor.


Figure 4. Arctic sea ice extent from observations (thick orange line) and 13 model forecasts used to formulate the 2007 IPCC report (light lines). The thick black line is the multi-model ensemble mean, with the standard deviation plotted as a dashed black line. Image has been updated to include the observed 2008 and 2009 measurements. None of the models predicted the record 2007 sea ice loss. Image credit: Arctic sea ice decline: Faster than forecast by Stroeve et al., 2007.

References
Francis, J.A., W. Chan, D.J. Leathers, J.R. Miller, and D.E. Veron, 2009, "Winter Northern Hemisphere weather patterns remember summer Arctic sea-ice extent", Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L07503, doi:10.1029/2009GL037274.

Honda, M., J. Inoue, and S. Yamane, 2009. Influence of low Arctic sea - ice minima on anomalously cold Eurasian winters, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L08707, doi:10.1029/2008GL037079.

Overland, J. E., M. Wang, and S. Salo, 2008: The recent Arctic warm period, Tellus, 60A, 589.597.

Overland, J. E., and M. Wang, 2010: Large-scale atmospheric circulation changes associated with the recent loss of Arctic sea ice. Tellus, 62A, 1–9.

Richter-Menge, J., and J.E. Overland, Eds., 2009: Arctic Report Card 2009, http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard.

Simmonds, I., and K. Keay (2009), Extraordinary September Arctic sea ice reductions and their relationships with storm behavior over 1979.2008, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L19715, doi:10.1029/2009GL039810.

Wu, B., J. Wang, and J. E. Walsh, 2006: Dipole anomaly in the winter Arctic atmosphere and its association with sea ice motion. J. Climate, 19, 210-225.

Zhang, X., A. Sorteberg, J. Zhang, R. Gerdes, and J. C. Comiso (2008), Recent radical shifts of atmospheric circulations and rapid changes in Arctic climate system, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L22701, doi:10.1029/2008GL035607.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 689 - 639

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37Blog Index

689. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
India Meteorological Department
Tropical Cyclone Advisory Number SEVENTEEN
CYCLONIC STORM WARD (BOB05-2009)
20:30 PM IST December 12 2009
=================================

Subject: Cyclonic storm over the southwest Bay of Bengal

Cyclone warning for Tamil Nadu and Puducherry coast: Orange Message

At 18:00 PM UTC, Cyclonic Storm Ward over southwest Bay of Bengal remained practically stationary and lays centered near 10.0N 83.5E, about 450 km east-northeast of Jaffna (Sri Lanka), 400 km east-southeast of Nagapattinam and 450 km east-northeast of Pamban. The system is likely to move in a west-southwesterly direction and cross north Sri Lanka near Lat. 9.0N around noon, tomorrow. It is then likely to emerge into Gulf of Mannar and cross south Tamil Nadu coast between Kanyakumari and Pamban around Sunday night However, the observations continue to show the sign of weakening.

Satellite imagery indicates no further organization of convection around system center. The dvorak intensity is T2.5. System shows intense to very intense convection over the area between 6.0 to 12.5N and 81.0 to 88.0E. The lowest cloud top temperature due to convection is -65C. The outgoing longwave radiation at 1500z is about 120-140 W/M2 in association with the system.

3 minutes sustained winds near the center is 35-40 knots with gusts of 50 knots and a central pressure of 998 hPa. The state of the sea is high around the system's center.

Vertical wind shear of horizontal wind over the region is moderate to high (15-25 knots). The system lies close to the south of tropospheric ridge which roughly runs along 11.0N

Considering all the above, the system is likely to move in a west-southwesterly direction and cross north Sri Lanka near 9.0N around noon, tomorrow. It is then likely to emerge into the Gulf of Mannar and cross south Tamil Nadu coast between Kanyakumari and Pamban around tomorrow night. 24 HRS forecast intensity is T2.0

Sustained winds of 35-40 knots with gusts of 50 knots is likely along and off north Sri Lanka coast tomorrow. Storm Surge oh height of 1 meter above astronomical tide is likely along north Sri Lanka coast at the time of landfall.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Drakoen:
Auburn, I did look at the historic probabilities, but this year has already strayed from climatology with an early Texas and SE snow. The teleconnections (negative AO, Negative NAO, Postive PNA) favor a displacement of an Artic anticyclone further south dragging with it cold air. The Subtropical jetstream branch has been very active with the advection of moisture from the Pacific. You result is more winter events in the southern plains and southeast.


And since the Caribbean/SW Atlantic ridge will significantly weaken into next week, I wonder what that means for Florida(I know it means perfect trajectories for cold late week into the Christmas week and possibly beyond. But could it also mean a dusting in Central Florida)?
Member Since: May 26, 2007 Posts: 47 Comments: 1214
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
685. Awwwwww, how cute is that? Thanks and hugs back at ya'. I have to ask hubby for lesson on how to post images; sometimes I can't find url or have other "challenges." :)

Got cold here a little while ago when sun went behind clouds. Me no like.

BBL. Doggys don't care; want walk.




Pretty graph shows you will have temperatures in the mid and upper 20's Christmas week. With a chance of snow 12-22 to 12-23 & again 12-25 to 12-26-09.

Top bar shows the wind driection, speed and mositure content expected in the atmosphere from the ground level to 18,000FT. The 20F line is the height into the atmosphere where it will be 20F. You will have light N or NE winds at the surface, W or WSW winds in the upper levels and plenty Of moisture. And the air temps will be in the 20's most of Cgristmas week.
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
685. Awwwwww, how cute is that? Thanks and hugs back at ya'. I have to ask hubby for lesson on how to post images; sometimes I can't find url or have other "challenges." :)

Got cold here a little while ago when sun went behind clouds. Me no like.

BBL. Doggys don't care; want walk.
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:

Thou Art Full of What Makes the Grass Grow Green!
(I think I was in junior high before I figured out that was mom cussing me out in Mom-speak...things were slower back then.)

Auburn, LOL, thank you, I can see, I can see...but 50 percent ain't good enough, please try and work on that. Borrow crayons from NWS, please...do they have dark blue?

Bordonaro...you and T-Dude SO deserve this. Please note there are Silver Spring wannabes, har-umphh! I love google...please send stock for Christmas!

PENGUIN Murals and Art, Silver Spring the best, currently undergoing restoration!


A million thank you's and a bear hug :0)

Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
636. Thanks for the reply. I'm sorry you didn't understand how I used your logic to extrapolate the obvious conclusion of your thought processes. You have said many times that the scientists are evil and crooked because they just want grant money. Then you also repeat on almost every blog that these same scientists and those who support their view claim that the science is completely settled.

Along that line of thinking the research would be complete so the grant funding should be discontinued, no? In order to keep the grant funding the part of the "conspiracy" that has escaped you must then be that the "evil" scientists blew the whistle on the "Climategate" to further their funding.

I was mostly being sarcastic. I would expect you to understand such humor considering the quips that you regularly throw out in regards to this debate.

I agree that raw data should be available. I wonder though if you understand that scientific papers are often based on filtered, homogenized, adapted, and otherwise analyzed data. I have heard many times that any data can be used to support any conclusion in the hands of a capable scientist. Does that mean we should then shun every attempt made by every scientist who sees AGW as the trend supported by this data. Conversely, those who can conclude the opposite should be given equal attention. I did say theory because that is just what it is. We have another theory that still can't be proven: gravity. It's there but we really don't quite grasp it true causation. Your not going to go jumping off of any buildings to prove it's not real though are you?

People who choose to stifle the debate get ignored. You seem to plainly state "debate over, the walls are crumbling, we won't have to hear about this anymore, etc". You do so with reckless abandon and you personally insult many bloggers who who would otherwise be adding to the discussions here by labeling them as part of some religion. I am personally surprised that you haven't been permanently banned for the attacks you have made and the insults that you have cast.

This is on top of the fact that the majority of your posts are based in your emotions and/or opinions. They are consistently not supported by the slightest scientific fact. Agian very hypocritical to deride me with such practices and not yourself.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Just in case no one noticed, we have a strange tropical cyclone in the Indian Ocean:

(From the JTWC on Cyclone 5B (Ward)):
TPIO10 PGTW 121813

A. TROPICAL CYCLONE 05B (WARD)

B. 12/1730Z

C. 8.7N

D. 83.6E

E. FIVE/MET7

F. T2.5/3.0/W0.5/24HRS STT: S0.0/06HRS

G. IR/EIR

That's close to the equator (where low pressure spins can't really happen)! How does that happen?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Link

Miracle on 34th Street (trailer)

have a great christmas season everyone!

oh yeah, my goodness it's raining like crazy here!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Bordonaro:
Awake in Maryland, the map shows you have a 5-10% chance of snow on Christmas :0)!

Thou Art Full of What Makes the Grass Grow Green!
(I think I was in junior high before I figured out that was mom cussing me out in Mom-speak...things were slower back then.)

Auburn, LOL, thank you, I can see, I can see...but 50 percent ain't good enough, please try and work on that. Borrow crayons from NWS, please...do they have dark blue?

Bordonaro...you and T-Dude SO deserve this. Please note there are Silver Spring wannabes, har-umphh! I love google...please send stock for Christmas!

PENGUIN Murals and Art, Silver Spring the best, currently undergoing restoration!

Add-on: Minor correction; oh, too bad, Delaware. Guess I'll stay on my side of the Bay!
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Link

Above link shows the GFS/NAM forecasts for emps for 12DEC-20DEC and for 20DEC-28DEC, 2009
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
676. auburn (Mod)
Quoting tornadodude:


dang, it is 41 here today


It got up to 40ish in town I think...but I am out in the woods here
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
well I'm out for the day, I'll try to be back on later, maybe with some freezing rain updates, later all!
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
Quoting auburn:
Never got over 37 here today...


dang, it is 41 here today
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
671. auburn (Mod)
Never got over 37 here today...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting auburn:


Now that I understand...Thax!!!


anytime!
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
Awake in Maryland, the map shows you have a 5-10% chance of snow on Christmas :0)!
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
668. auburn (Mod)
Quoting Drakoen:


Simplified version: Cold further south + moisture in place = snow.
Quoting tornadodude:


The weather pattern is more active, the storms are going farther south than usual, and the colder weather is also dipping farther south more often than usual. so more chances for snow


Now that I understand...Thax!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:

Trade? We're pet-friendly...if that helps.
lol
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 19607
666. auburn (Mod)
Quoting AwakeInMaryland:
650. Auburn, could you please blow up that snow probability map? How am I supposed to see Maryland and Delaware without a microscope? :)

Try this...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting auburn:


Ummm thank you...but I have NO clue what you just said...LOL...I have spent more time on the Docs blog today than I have all the years I have been here on WU...I am trying to learn...


The weather pattern is more active, the storms are going farther south than usual, and the colder weather is also dipping farther south more often than usual. so more chances for snow
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
Quoting auburn:


Ummm thank you...but I have NO clue what you just said...LOL...I have spent more time on the Docs blog today than I have all the years I have been here on WU...I am trying to learn...


Simplified version: Cold further south + moisture in place = snow.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
662. auburn (Mod)
Quoting Drakoen:
Auburn, I did look at the historic probabilities, but this year has already strayed from climatology with an early Texas and SE snow. The teleconnections (negative AO, Negative NAO, Postive PNA) favor a displacement of an Artic anticyclone further south dragging with it cold air. The Subtropical jetstream branch has been very active with the advection of moisture from the Pacific. You result is more winter events in the southern plains and southeast.


Ummm thank you...but I have NO clue what you just said...LOL...I have spent more time on the Docs blog today than I have all the years I have been here on WU...I am trying to learn...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Tornado Dude, we're having mid-winter tempertatures in late fall:

DFW AP, Dallas-Ft Worth, TX Prelimenary 12-09 climate data from 12-1 through 12-11-09:

AVERAGE MONTHLY: 39.0

DPTR FM NORMAL: -9.7

HIGHEST: 55 ON 8

LOWEST: 22 ON 10
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
650. Auburn, could you please blow up that snow probability map? How am I supposed to see Maryland and Delaware without a microscope? :)
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Auburn, I did look at the historic probabilities, but this year has already strayed from climatology with an early Texas and SE snow. The teleconnections (negative AO, Negative NAO, Postive PNA) favor a displacement of an Artic anticyclone further south dragging with it cold air. The Subtropical jetstream branch has been very active with the advection of moisture from the Pacific. You result is more winter events in the southern plains and southeast.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting auburn:


WOW!!!


yeah! I loved that storm, then the temperatures dipped below zero for lows and single digits for highs. It was great. And a week before the storm hit, we had 50 degrees and rainy forecast for those days. LOL that's why I never trust the track of a system like that
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
657. auburn (Mod)
Quoting tornadodude:
here was my best white Christmas (NWS):

December 22, 2004 Winter Storm

...Record snowfall up to two feet paralyzed much of the region...

* Evansville - 22.3 inches (19.3" on Dec. 22 and 3.0" on Dec. 23). This storm set a new 24-hour snowfall record, and made this the second snowiest December for Evansville.
* Paducah - 14.2 inches. This storm set a new 24-hour snowfall record, and made this the snowiest December for Paducah.

This winter storm was accompanied by gusty north winds that produced drifts up to 5 feet deep. Many roads were closed or impassable. Interstate 64 in southwest Indiana was closed for about three days due to extensive drifting. On Interstate 24 in western Kentucky, a 29-mile long traffic jam formed from Trigg County into Lyon County. An estimated 1,000 people were stranded in their vehicles overnight. The National Guard was mobilized for both the Interstate 64 and Interstate 24 incidents. Traffic was reported stopped on other interstates as well, including the interchange of Interstates 55 and 57 in southeast Missouri.


WOW!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
656. auburn (Mod)
Sorry for this repost...I hope no one minds



Birmingham area

* For Birmingham, where nearly 100 years of weather records exist, there has never been a White Christmas in the classic sense.
* Perhaps the closest resemblance to a White Christmas in Birmingham was December, 1985. Flurries falling on Christmas Eve and early Christmas morning lightly dusted some areas, but snow was not deep enough to measure.
* Eight other trace snowfall events occurring in 1961, 1963, 1966, 1980, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1995 were reported at the Birmingham International Airport on either December 24th or 25th.
* Weather records show that 5.5 inches of snow fell at the city office on December 22, 1929. On December 24th, there was still 2.5 inches of snow on the ground at 7 PM. However, most of the snow melted Christmas Day when the temperature climbed to 51 degrees.

Montgomery area

* For Montgomery, there has not been a White Christmas since 1919. The closest Montgomery has come to a White Christmas was in 1962 when a trace of snow was observed on December 24th. However, a near miss occurred in 1935 when 1.4 inches of snow fell on December 21-22.

Tuscaloosa area

* Tuscaloosa has only reported two trace snowfall events in 1962 and 1985 on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

Anniston area

* Anniston has reported a total of seven trace snowfall events in 1963, 1970, 1985, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1995 on either December 24th or 25th, but has never seen a true White Christmas.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JFLORIDA:
Cont:

Dr. Walsh said the data tying the cooling to stronger winds was convincing. ''My one reservation,'' he said, ''is the link to the ozone.''

He noted that the ozone hole was usually largest in November or December, but that the greatest cooling had been about six months later.

Dr. Thompson agreed that the ozone hole could not explain the whole climactic picture, and said other influences like ocean currents probably played important roles, too.


''I seriously doubt it's the only player,'' he said. ''I think it's one of many.''


From Jeff Masters:
Arctic Dipole blamed for drier winters in Northern Europe
Francis et al. (2009) found that during 1979 - 2006, years that had unusually low summertime Arctic sea had a 10 - 20% reduction in the temperature difference between the Equator and North Pole.
This resulted in a weaker jet stream with slower winds that lasted a full six months, through fall and winter.
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
here was my best white Christmas (NWS):

December 22, 2004 Winter Storm

...Record snowfall up to two feet paralyzed much of the region...

* Evansville - 22.3 inches (19.3" on Dec. 22 and 3.0" on Dec. 23). This storm set a new 24-hour snowfall record, and made this the second snowiest December for Evansville.
* Paducah - 14.2 inches. This storm set a new 24-hour snowfall record, and made this the snowiest December for Paducah.

This winter storm was accompanied by gusty north winds that produced drifts up to 5 feet deep. Many roads were closed or impassable. Interstate 64 in southwest Indiana was closed for about three days due to extensive drifting. On Interstate 24 in western Kentucky, a 29-mile long traffic jam formed from Trigg County into Lyon County. An estimated 1,000 people were stranded in their vehicles overnight. The National Guard was mobilized for both the Interstate 64 and Interstate 24 incidents. Traffic was reported stopped on other interstates as well, including the interchange of Interstates 55 and 57 in southeast Missouri.
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
Quoting JFLORIDA:
On a whole weren't you guys atmo and company complaining that GW discussion never went anywhere. I think they were responding to that, at least in the letters I have gotten that's the case.,

No idea what you mean...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Bordonaro:


It might crack 52F today. It's Mostly Cloudy about 44F. We're supposed to be Pt Sunny and 74F tomorrow, 68F Monday and 54F Tuesday.


ah, so you're getting a heat wave, eh? ha

supposed to be 43 today, some freezing rain tonight then rain, 39 tomorrow and monday, then 47 tuesday, and back to the low 30's for the rest of the week :P
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
650. auburn (Mod)
Quoting Drakoen:


Yes it is


Cant be true...LOL...that has never happed here


Birmingham area

* For Birmingham, where nearly 100 years of weather records exist, there has never been a White Christmas in the classic sense.
* Perhaps the closest resemblance to a White Christmas in Birmingham was December, 1985. Flurries falling on Christmas Eve and early Christmas morning lightly dusted some areas, but snow was not deep enough to measure.
* Eight other trace snowfall events occurring in 1961, 1963, 1966, 1980, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1995 were reported at the Birmingham International Airport on either December 24th or 25th.
* Weather records show that 5.5 inches of snow fell at the city office on December 22, 1929. On December 24th, there was still 2.5 inches of snow on the ground at 7 PM. However, most of the snow melted Christmas Day when the temperature climbed to 51 degrees.

Montgomery area

* For Montgomery, there has not been a White Christmas since 1919. The closest Montgomery has come to a White Christmas was in 1962 when a trace of snow was observed on December 24th. However, a near miss occurred in 1935 when 1.4 inches of snow fell on December 21-22.

Tuscaloosa area

* Tuscaloosa has only reported two trace snowfall events in 1962 and 1985 on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

Anniston area

* Anniston has reported a total of seven trace snowfall events in 1963, 1970, 1985, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1995 on either December 24th or 25th, but has never seen a true White Christmas.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting tornadodude:


yeah lol how's the weather down there?


It might crack 52F today. It's Mostly Cloudy about 44F. We're supposed to be Pt Sunny and 74F tomorrow, 68F Monday and 54F Tuesday.
Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
Quoting auburn:
I dont understand this really...but it looks like its calling for some snow in this area...right?



Yes it is
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Bordonaro:


Exactly :0)



yeah lol how's the weather down there?
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
645. auburn (Mod)
I dont understand this really...but it looks like its calling for some snow in this area...right?

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Drakoen:
I'm glad i'm going up north for Christmas. Florida just doesn't have that Christmas feel when its 85 degrees outside.

Trade? We're pet-friendly...if that helps.
Member Since: August 19, 2008 Posts: 32 Comments: 1918
Quoting auburn:


yes and I live in Auburn..


oh ok, nice school
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
Quoting tornadodude:


you've been waiting all day to use those:P lol


Exactly :0)

Member Since: August 25, 2009 Posts: 20 Comments: 6785
641. auburn (Mod)
Quoting tornadodude:


no problem!

Did you go to Auburn?


yes and I live in Auburn..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting auburn:


Thank you tornadodude!!!!!!


no problem!

Did you go to Auburn?
Member Since: June 28, 2006 Posts: 24 Comments: 8185
639. auburn (Mod)
Quoting tornadodude:


right here


Thank you tornadodude!!!!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 689 - 639

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.