Warmest January on record for the lower atmosphere

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:37 PM GMT on February 17, 2010

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Earth's lower atmosphere recorded its warmest January on record last month, according to data from both the University of Alabama, Hunstville (UAH) and Remote Sensing Systems (Figure 1). The satellite measurements used to take the global temperature of the lower atmosphere began in December 1978, using the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) on polar-orbiting satellites. The January 2010 temperature anomaly was an impressive 0.72°C above the 1979 - 1998 average, easily beating the previous record of 0.59°C set in January 2007. Last month's anomaly was the 3rd warmest anomaly for any month, falling just 0.04°C cooler than the record warmest anomalies of 0.76°C from February and April 1998. The January 2010 satellite-measured temperatures continued a trend of very warm conditions we've seen in the lower atmosphere since the current El Niño event began in June 2009. Record high temperatures occurred in November 2009, and were the second highest on record in both July and September 2009, according to UAH. The record-breaking temperatures in the lower atmosphere are due to the heating of the atmosphere by the strong El Niño event that has been heating the waters of the Central and Eastern Pacific since June 2009, combined with the global warming trend of the past few decades. Since we are currently at the lowest level of solar output in decades, the Earth is currently about 0.1°C cooler than if we were near the maximum of the 11-year sunspot cycle. Had we been near solar maximum, we would have set an all-time warmest lower atmosphere temperature anomaly record last month.(Note, though, that there is about a 2-year time lag between solar maximum and when Earth's global temperature responds). It will be interesting to see if the current El Niño event, which is quite a bit weaker than the record-strongest El Niño of 1998, is capable of making 2010 beat 1998 for honors as the warmest year on record in the lower atmosphere.


Figure 1. Temperature of the lowest 8km of the atmosphere measured by satellite via the MSU instrument flown on polar-orbiting satellites between 1979 - 2010. Image credit: Dr. Roy Spencer, University of Alabama, Hunstville.

Real-time display of atmospheric temperatures measured by satellite
The University of Alabama, Huntsville has a handy interactive plotting page that lets one plot up the historical and near-real-time satellite measurements of Earth's global average temperature at various levels of the atmosphere. These temperatures are measured by the MSU instrument on the polar-orbiting NOAA-15 satellite. Note that this is a different instrument than the AQUA satellite's MSU instrument used by UAH to formulate their official monthly global temperature anomaly data set. The two satellites give similar results, although NOAA-15 requires an additional correction to account for drift of the satellite.


Figure 2. Temperature of the global atmosphere at 14,000 feet (4.4 km) as measured by the MSU instrument on the polar-orbiting NOAA-15 satellite. This instrument has been flying since August 1998. The 20-year average (yellow line) and 20-year record highs (pink line) are for the period 1979 - 1998, using versions of the MSU instrument that flew on older satellites. The most recent data (green line), as of February 15, 2010, are marked by a white square, and have now fallen below the record for the date set in 1998. Note that during July 2009, November 2009, and January 2010, record high temperatures were measured at 14,000 feet altitude. A full description of the data is available from the University of Alabama, Hunstville.

Error sources in global atmospheric temperatures measured by satellite
Satellite-measured temperatures of Earth's atmosphere, in my judgment, are inferior to using the surface based system of ground stations and ocean buoys for measuring global temperature changes. I have two reasons for saying this:

1) The satellite temperatures show large global increases when there is an El Niño event. While the surface also experiences an upward spike in temperatures during an El Niño, it is much less pronounced than the atmospheric heating that occurs. Since we live at the surface, those temperatures are more relevant.

2) According to a description of the MSU data available on the Remote Sensing Systems web site where the data is archived,


"The instruments in the MSU series were intended for day to day operational use in weather forecasting and thus are not calibrated to the precision needed for climate studies. A climate quality dataset can be extracted from their measurements only by careful inter-calibration of the eleven distinct MSU instruments."


In other words, it's very tricky to make an accurate measurement of Earth's temperature going back to 1979, when satellite measurements began. You have to merge data from eleven separate satellites, whose instruments were never designed to make the kind of precise long-term climate measurements that are being asked of them. While surface stations also have error sources, I believe that the uncertainty in the satellite-based global temperature measurements are higher.

Dr. John Christy of the University of Alabama, Huntsville, made a series of efforts to perform the careful inter-calibration needed beginning in the 1990s, and for over a decade successfully defended his conclusion that the MSU instruments were showing a much lower level of tropospheric warming than what climate models predicted. Christy was probably the most quoted scientist by the "greenhouse skeptics" during that period, and testified numerous times before Congress about his findings. This discrepancy was a prime argument Senator James Inhofe (R-Oklahoma) used in his famed 2003 speech when he referred to the threat of catastrophic global warming as the "greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people." Greenhouse contrarian Dr. S. Fred Singer, who has probably more Congressional testimony about global warming under his belt than any other scientist, headlined his SEPP website for many years with the quote, "Computer models forecast rapidly rising global temperatures, but data from weather satellites and balloon instruments show no warming whatsoever. Nevertheless, these same unreliable computer models underpin the Global Climate Treaty." Michael Crichton also used the tropospheric warming discrepancy to give climate models a bad rap in his State of Fear novel. However, a series of papers published in 2004 and 2005 showed that the satellite inter-calibration methods used by Christy were incorrect. Christy conceded that his analysis had been in error, and participated in writing a statement put out by NOAA's Climate Change Science Program that detailed the error.

Climate change contrarians continue to prefer using the UAH satellite data to look at global temperature trends, since that data set shows less warming than the regular surface station data sets, and rates 1998 as the warmest year on record. The UAH data shows that in the 31-year period from 1979 - 2009, Earth's lower atmospheric temperature warmed by 0.13°C per decade. A separate analysis of the satellite data by Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) puts this number at 0.15°C per decade. For comparison, NASA's GISS and the UK HadCRUT surface data sets (which don't use satellite data) show warming of 0.16°C and 0.15°C per decade, respectively. You can generate these numbers yourself, using the excellent woodfortrees.org plotting tools. The amount of global warming predicted in the 2007 IPCC report for the period 2010 - 2030 was 0.20°C per decade, so we are running about 25% below this predicted level of warming, when averaging over the past 31 years.

For further reading: I have a 2006 blog post on this, and realclimate.org has a technical discussion.

Portlight continues relief efforts in Haiti
The Portlight.org disaster-relief effort continues in Haiti, with another container of specifically-requested medical supplies being shipped today. At the request of Portlight's on-site coordinator, Richard Lumarque, Portlight is committed to sending another container with 500 tents plus food and water. The cost of each shipment is $4300, so your donations are greatly appreciated! Please visit the Portlight.org blog to learn more and to donate. Floodman's blog has the latest info on Portlight's plan for Haitian relief.


Figure 3. Richard Lumarque, Portlight's on-site coordinator in Haiti, poses with double-amputee Darline Exidor, who received a wheelchair from Portlight. Portlight's team of ten relief workers has been laboring full-time the past two weeks to deliver donated supplies and assess the needs of the earthquake survivors.

Next post
I'll have a new post on Thursday or Friday.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting Floodman:
Yeah, but when Toronto is short 80% of their average snowfall and their temps are 20-30F warmer than average for the wnter, what does that say?

I'm a moderate when it comes to the whole CC debate, but it angers me when people make generalized statments like "It's 10 degrees in Richmond Virginia, where's the AGW now?" It's being felt in Canada! Deniers are just as guilty as the ultra AGW advocates when it comes to using only the data that proves their statements and ignoring the rest...
Flood, might I suggest that even the terms used by both sides add to the fray. The term denier implies that something known as fact (see my other posts for that opinion, if you care) is being denied. The term advocate implies support of a known fact. Skeptic and supporter may work better. I'm a math guy so the issue is simple: until we have valid, objective data that can be translated into useful information at some level of statistical significance, GW, CC, and next weeks term for it is, today, a theory that is neither proven nor disproven. Everything short of that is opinion, to which each person here, or not here, is entitled to. My $.02.
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 826
125 -- 47n91w, It is important to consider the snow type also. 1" of rain can make the equivalent of 2"- 20 or more inches of snow. How your home is engineered and constructed is the defining factor when it comes to it's ability to support a load. That varies significantly.

As referenced in a previous post, building codes in many areas play a very important role in safety. Hurricane Wilma, in S FLA., showed that most new structures, up to code, suffered little damage. Older structures suffered extensive damage.

This was an interesting site for snow info :)

http://nsidc.org/snow/faq.html
Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
<blockquote class='blogquote'>Quoting Levi32:
Anyone notice Invest 90C in the Central Pacific south of Hawaii? I find this feature to be quite interesting. First of all it's rare to have an invest anywhere east of the international date line during the winter in the northern hemisphere. However, it's not all in the northern hemisphere.

Will also be interesting to see what happens in the E-Pac season this year....
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Quoting StormChaser81:
Here's a lot of snow!!!
Just stunning!
The most images seem to be from 2008. How is it this season?


Norilsk climate is impressive not only in winter - here is a brooding storm over the city, spring 2009

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2010/02/lots-of-snow.html
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Jeff9641 you have mail AGAIN.
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Anyone notice Invest 90C in the Central Pacific south of Hawaii? I find this feature to be quite interesting. First of all it's rare to have an invest anywhere east of the international date line during the winter in the northern hemisphere. However, it's not all in the northern hemisphere. The whole mass is centered right over the equator, with a sort of double-low structure. The northern center is at 2N (90C invest) and the southern center is in the southern hemisphere near 4S. Watching this loop you can see the two centers trying to spin opposite ways due to them being in different hemispheres. The outflow patterns also show this.

This whole large area of convection is a result of a very strong negative SOI pulse (the -80 a few days ago) that is moving eastward across the Pacific. The MJO has also been active in the central Pacific over the last week, although it is beginning to fade.

The system is too close to the equator for any significant tropical development in either hemisphere, but I find it very cool.

Member Since: November 24, 2005 Posts: 635 Comments: 26556
Quoting NttyGrtty:
Yep, heard that and that water vapor statement is only a "fact" if other environments are held constant...like pressure and the composition of the "air"
Well, yeah. That doesn't take away from the fact that in order to scientifically test a hypothesis or theory, you have to... keep all other factors constant. I don't see how your statements in any way refute what Skye said.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
Dr. Masters you write:"The amount of global warming predicted in the 2007 IPCC report for the period 2010 - 2030 was 0.20C per decade, so we are running about 25% below this predicted level of warming, when averaging over the past 31 years."

Firstoff i think it is a little early to make a statement for the current anual record? And second the warmth so far for 2010 is 0.18C.

NOAA: Warmest January in both satellite records
Warming is 0.18C
(.32F) decade
http://climateprogress.org/2010/02/16/noaa-warmest-january-on-record-in-both-satellite-records/

Or maybe i understand something wrong, please point it out.
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139. Skyepony (Mod)
Oss~ It says in the study that ocean currents aren't taken into account in climate models.. It was one reason climate models didn't see us losing arctic sea ice as fast as we have. It didn't take into consideration a change in currents that resulted in ice being swept out to sea in the Arctic. Climate models aren't perfect, many times the most pessimistic hasn't been pessimistic enough.

Like this study (I posted the abstract the other day). Fun to know the details. Pretty cool taking temps using seals. There seems a sudden concern about Greenland & Antarctica melting from the bottom edges, kind of crumbling the buttresses. Does show too the gulf stream isn't slowing down. The more that is studied the more dynamic it looks. Amazing how different parts, temps salinity, currents & all can be from one year to the next.
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From today's Update on the current ENSO cycle; If this forecast holds (per the current model runs) we will probably have a transition in place from El Nino to Enso-Neutral conditions during our H-Season but the question will always be "when" as we approach the season.....

CURRENT STATUS as at 17th February 2010
Next update expected by 3rd March 2010 (two weeks after this update)

This is supported by the sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean, which have eased very slightly towards their mean conditions during the past two weeks, though remain at levels typical of an El Niño event. However, the decreased trade winds have led to some warming below the surface, which may prolong the decay of the El Niño event in the Pacific. Similarly, climate models suggest that tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures should gradually ease towards neutral values, though are likely to remain above El Niño thresholds into the southern autumn. Models surveyed currently show little to no indication of a reinvigoration of El Niño for 2010.

In Brief
Although tropical Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures remain warmer than the long-term average, sea surface temperatures have eased slightly towards average since a peak in December. The sub-surface water of the tropical Pacific also remains warmer than the long-term average. The SOI has fallen rapidly during the past three weeks partly due to several tropical depressions and severe Tropical Cyclone Oli affecting Tahiti. The latest approximate 30-day value of the SOI is −24. Trade winds are weak across the central Pacific, due to a strong westerly wind burst that has propagated eastwards during the past month. Cloudiness near the date-line has increased and is well above average. Most international computer models are predicting that El Niño conditions will persist through the remainder of the southern hemisphere summer, with a return to neutral conditions by the southern hemisphere winter.
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Yeah, but when Toronto is short 80% of their average snowfall and their temps are 20-30F warmer than average for the wnter, what does that say?

I'm a moderate when it comes to the whole CC debate, but it angers me when people make generalized statments like "It's 10 degrees in Richmond Virginia, where's the AGW now?" It's being felt in Canada! Deniers are just as guilty as the ultra AGW advocates when it comes to using only the data that proves their statements and ignoring the rest...
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Quoting 47n91w:


Someone posted a graphic a few days ago that showed roof slope and the recommended maximum snow load. It was a good graphic, so thanks to the poster!

I did start thinking about roof slopes and snow weight, with my mind focusing on my own roof. I've never measured the slope with a level, but it is in the 30% range.

I average between 6 and 8 feet of snow per year at my location. Last year I measured a total of 7 feet and already this year I've had the same (with another 1.5 months to go).

Granted, through sublimation, compaction, and some melting, I only have 22 inches of snow on the ground, but the liquid equivalent is quite high. No, I do not usually take snowpack core samples, so I'm not sure exactly how much is being held in a frozen state.

With all that, I really have never worried about stress on the roof. Neither have I seen many people in my region climb on their roofs to shovel the snow off, although there are a few old-timers who recount days gone-by when there was so much snow they had to tunnel to the outhouse (not kidding).

Either way, I'm guessing that most homes built in my area are designed for a certain amount of snow load... so I guess I won't start worrying now. I will admit however, in the last few days I've caught myself occasionally glancing up to my ceiling while I imagine the current weight pushing down on the roof and walls.
The houses we build in South Florida are very strong now. They are inspected through every stage of construction. And you cannot get a permit to continue construction until you have the building inspectors signature.
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Quoting Floodman:


What your'e not mentioning is that the areas that typically get a great deal of snow and extremely cold weather are seeing unusually warm weather and very little snow...


When one place gets cold, the other gets warm, the warm air has to go somewhere.
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Quoting Skyepony:
NttyGrtty~ Ya ever heard "it's too cold to snow"? Or did ya know the fact that warmer air holds more water vapor than colder air?
Yep, heard that and that water vapor statement is only a "fact" if other environments are held constant...like pressure and the composition of the "air"
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 826
Quoting Jeff9641:


I could use some GW right now. GW is a bunch of political propaganda. Of course it is hot in Rio because it is summer there. No one on here seems to realize that Europe & Asia has endured one of there coldest winters as well. Coastal China has had record snowfall on a few occassions this winter which is rare for them.


What your'e not mentioning is that the areas that typically get a great deal of snow and extremely cold weather are seeing unusually warm weather and very little snow...
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Quoting jeffs713:

Exactly. I don't make the people posting stupid comments go poof.... I just ignore the comments. I have better things to do with my time, other than get into some silly contest to see who can yell loudest.
Really? As a long time lurker here, I've seen you yell pretty loud. Everyone on here yells from time to time, just depends on a. the subject and b. who swings first. The "experts" seem to think they can yell when they want but then be above it at other times. Not poking, just reporting an observation.
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 826
130. Skyepony (Mod)
NttyGrtty~ Ya ever heard "it's too cold to snow"? Or did ya know the fact that warmer air holds more water vapor than colder air?
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Quoting AwakeInMaryland:


Because we're too happy, and busy -- and tolerant -- to care to respond to that silliness anymore!!

Exactly. I don't make the people posting stupid comments go poof.... I just ignore the comments. I have better things to do with my time, other than get into some silly contest to see who can yell loudest.
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5875
127. Skyepony (Mod)
I found a much better written article about the study findings a few weeks ago from the near 370 scientist that went on the cruise to the Arctic for 2 years. The other article we questioned if ice free winters was a writer's error. It was... This article has a link to data, findings from the ship. Wish I had time to pour over it.
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"An amazing, though clearly little-known, scientific fact: We get more snow storms in warm years!" Facts are, pretty much, known. Anytime someone has to state that something is a fact, it, more often than not, isn't. More snow storms is warm years is a theory. The sum of the angles of a triangle equaling 180 degrees is a scientific fact.
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 826
Quoting hydrus:
That house must have a sturdy roof to carry the weight of all that snow.


Someone posted a graphic a few days ago that showed roof slope and the recommended maximum snow load. It was a good graphic, so thanks to the poster!

I did start thinking about roof slopes and snow weight, with my mind focusing on my own roof. I've never measured the slope with a level, but it is in the 30% range.

I average between 6 and 8 feet of snow per year at my location. Last year I measured a total of 7 feet and already this year I've had the same (with another 1.5 months to go).

Granted, through sublimation, compaction, and some melting, I only have 22 inches of snow on the ground, but the liquid equivalent is quite high. No, I do not usually take snowpack core samples, so I'm not sure exactly how much is being held in a frozen state.

With all that, I really have never worried about stress on the roof. Neither have I seen many people in my region climb on their roofs to shovel the snow off, although there are a few old-timers who recount days gone-by when there was so much snow they had to tunnel to the outhouse (not kidding).

Either way, I'm guessing that most homes built in my area are designed for a certain amount of snow load... so I guess I won't start worrying now. I will admit however, in the last few days I've caught myself occasionally glancing up to my ceiling while I imagine the current weight pushing down on the roof and walls.
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This was an interesting read.

How Do Climate Models Work?
July 13th, 2009 by Roy W. Spencer, Ph. D.


I am still trying to find where in the climate modeling world the ocean currents are taken into consideration and can't find it. Just look at the brand new study in post 55 on the ocean currents impact on Greenland. JMHO :)

Member Since: June 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8185
Quoting hydrus:
That house must have a sturdy roof to carry the weight of all that snow.


Im pretty sure houses that expect high snow amounts are built like the ski resorts cabins of tops of mountains, otherwise I dont see how it could keep the roof up.
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Quoting StormChaser81:


No problem, I couldnt imagine living in amounts of snow like that.
That house must have a sturdy roof to carry the weight of all that snow.
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Quoting hydrus:
Your link has amazing pictures on it. Thanks for taking the time to post them.


No problem, I couldnt imagine living in amounts of snow like that.
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Quoting StormChaser81:


Well if you get there, send me a zip lock of warm air, I'll release it in my living room.
Your link has amazing pictures on it. Thanks for taking the time to post them.
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For Information--
Trinidad (11n 61w) is experiencing a very serious dry season.
Rainfall for Nov and Dec were low (30% of average at my location, Central Trinidad). Resevoirs are low. Water restrictions are in effect. Fires are already prevalent.
Take the above in the context that the dry season runs from Jan to June.
We do not expect rain until June.
I was in the rain forests of the Northern Range yesterday, and many of the streams and small rivers are already dry or almost so. This is very unusual for Feb.
Venezuela is already in crisis for water (driest wet season in 100 years).
The situation looks pretty grim....
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Thanks,Storm,yeh,I thought it would normally fluctuate,but it has helped to block most of the storms from new england.
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Global Warming??
Not where I am. It's only 91 F right now. But that's OK. It has happened before on this day, in 1999.
So yeah, its been 'as hot' or 'hotter' in the past.
Very comforting.......
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Quoting AwakeInMaryland:


You betcha. I noted earlier today...the new DIL in Maui might have to make room for Mommy!


Well if you get there, send me a zip lock of warm air, I'll release it in my living room.
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Quoting StormChaser81:


Of course Hawaii was first, I'd be happy if I lived there too. lol


You betcha. I noted earlier today...the new DIL in Maui might have to make room for Mommy!
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Quoting AwakeInMaryland:




Of course Hawaii was first, I'd be happy if I lived there too. lol
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Quoting NttyGrtty:
What has become of this blog where one can bash Al Gore and get no response?...tsk, tsk, it's a shame...a shame! Next thing you know, you all will be discussing weather! Where will that lead?


Because we're too happy, and busy -- and tolerant -- to care to respond to that silliness anymore!! Whoo Hoo!
Maryland: No. 14
Texas: No. 24
Florida: No. 35

Full List

Happiest States: Hawaii Moves into First Place
Jeanna Bryner
LiveScience Managing Editor
livescience.com Tue Feb 16, 10:16 am ET

If you needed an extra twist of the arm to set off on a Hawaii vacation, here it is: The big-wave state was the happiest place to live in 2009, according to a newly released national survey.

Topping the well-being list among all 50 states, Hawaii pulled ahead of the 2008 leader Utah. But Utah and its neighbors still have plenty to smile about. Nine of the top 10 well-being states reside in the Midwest and the West. The south didn't fare so well, taking seven of the 11 lowest well-being spots on the list.

The results come from interviews with more than 350,000 American adults who took part in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index in 2009. This is the second year of the survey.

The well-being score for each state is an average of six sub-categories, including: life evaluation (self-evaluation about your present life situation and anticipated one in five years); emotional health; work environment (such as job satisfaction); physical health; healthy behavior; basic access (access to healthcare, a doctor, a safe place to exercise and walk, as well as community satisfaction).

The top 10 states and their average well-being scores (out of a possible 100 points):

* Hawaii: 70.2
* Utah: 68.3
* Montana: 68.3
* Minnesota: 67.8
* Iowa: 67.6
* Vermont: 67.4
* Colorado: 67.3
* Alaska: 67.3
* North Dakota: 67.3
* Kansas: 67.2

A complete list of the 2009 happiest states is here.

Hawaii also topped the charts for life evaluation, emotional health and physical health, while West Virginia scored the worst on those indexes. Utah was number-one for work environment, scoring 10 points more than the worst state, Delaware.

Bad news for Mississippi, which scored lowest on the basic access index. For healthy behavior, Vermont topped the list while Kentucky scored the worst.

Overall, state well-being stayed pretty stable from 2008 to 2009. Only four states - South Dakota, Mississippi, Hawaii, and Iowa - upped their scores by two or more points compared with 2008. Wyoming had the greatest drop of 1.3 points since 2008. Compared with 2008, 18 states moved in a negative direction, 27 in a positive direction, and five stayed the same.

As for why one state tops the list while another fails miserably, in the past researchers have looked at the relationship between 2008 well-being scores and various factors, including economic indicators, education levels, personality traits and levels of inclusiveness. They found the states with higher gross regional product (GRP) per capita (level of productivity and standard of living), higher income levels and higher median housing value, were significantly happier than poorer areas.

In addition, the happiest states in 2008 tended to have more residents with advanced educations and jobs that were considered "super-creative," such as architecture, engineering, computer and math occupations, library positions, arts and design work, as well as entertainment, sports and media occupations.

Level of inclusiveness was also important, according to the research on the 2008 scores, with some of the states scoring best for well-being also being the most tolerant.

If you're wondering if people in a particular state are happy, you might just want to ask them. Another team of researchers reported results last year in the journal Science showing that a person's self-reported happiness matches up with objective measures of well-being. A separate happiest states list, generated from the individual surveys of this study, differed from the 2008 and 2009 lists that relied on the Gallup-Healthways data.

Essentially, the team publishing their work in Science used their data to statistically create a representative American. That way they could take, for example, a 38-year-old woman with a high-school diploma and making medium-wage who is living anywhere and transplant her to another state and get a rough estimate of her happiness level.

* Original Story: Happiest States: Hawaii Moves into First Place

LiveScience.com chronicles the daily advances and innovations made in science and technology. We take on the misconceptions that often pop up around scientific discoveries and deliver short, provocative explanations with a certain wit and style.
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Quoting GlobalBS:
Just another piece promoting GW in the face of all the news about faked data and manipulated numbers. Now they are saying that GW is causing the cold. They are just trying to keep the hoax alive. Looking for spring here.

An amazing, though clearly little-known, scientific fact: We get more snow storms in warm years!

http://climateprogress.org/2010/02/15/an-amazing-though-clearly-little-known-scientific-fact-we-get -more-snow-storms-in-warm-years/#more-18963



MSNBC’s Ratigan: “These ‘snowpocalypses’ that have been going through DC and other extreme weather events are precisely what climate scientists have been predicting, fearing and anticipating because of global warming.”
http://climateprogress.org/2010/02/10/msnbcs-ratigan-these-%E2%80%98snowpocalypses%E2%80%99-extreme -weather-events-what-climate-scientists-have-been-predicting/


The United States of Snow
http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=1431&tstamp=
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Quoting Jeff9641:


I could use some GW right now. GW is a bunch of political propaganda. Of course it is hot in Rio because it is summer there. No one on here seems to realize that Europe & Asia has endured one of there coldest winters as well. Coastal China has had record snowfall on a few occassions this winter which is rare for them.


Of course it's cold in the US and europe and asia, it's winter!
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Here's a lot of snow!!!


Norislk, Siberia




Oops left the window open, Darn!

Lots of SNOW
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Quoting NttyGrtty:
Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?
Gore is busy counting the money he has made from G.W. issue. I always wondered how much?
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Better than a rodent sticking it's head out of a hole. :)

Spring training arrives to warm your world
Pitchers and catches reporting means summer is around the corner
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Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 826
Quoting Floodman:


It's going to be an interesting year, StormW!
I hope ( interesting ) is all it will be and nothing more. My guess so far is 13 named storms. I say this mostly because of SST,s.
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What has become of this blog where one can bash Al Gore and get no response?...tsk, tsk, it's a shame...a shame! Next thing you know, you all will be discussing weather! Where will that lead?
Member Since: February 11, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 826
Quoting Jeff9641:
If GW is occuring then why all the cold this winter. Notice AL GORE is in hiding right now along with JFLORIDA.


I seen a sign up on a business yesterday and it said Al Gore where is global warming now?
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Hi,Storm,haven't talked to you in a while.
Is it normal for the NAO to be negative for such a long stretch?
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Scattered Clouds
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Scattered Clouds