Sean brushes Bermuda; largest wave ever surfed; Tipton tornado an EF-4

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:26 PM GMT on November 11, 2011

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Tropical Storm Sean brushed by Bermuda this morning, bringing winds near tropical storm force to the island. Top sustained winds at the Bermuda airport were 37 mph this morning, and a gust of 56 mph occurred at 4:38 am AST. Dry air disrupted the circulation of Sean before it reached Bermuda, and the island picked up just 0.08" of rain as of 10 am AST today. Sean is headed northeastward, out to sea, and will cease to exist later today or on Saturday. Sean may not be the last storm of the season, however. The most recent runs of the GFS, NOGAPS, and ECMWF models all predict an extratropical storm capable of transitioning to a subtropical or tropical storm will form in the middle Atlantic late next week. If such a storm did form, it would be called Tammy, and would not threaten any land areas.


Figure 1. A wet, windy day in Bermuda: morning webcam image from the island. Image credit: freddiebda's webcam.

Largest wave ever surfed
A new world record was set this week for the largest wave ever surfed. On Tuesday, November 8, Hawaiian big wave rider Garrett McNamara caught a 90-foot (27 meter) wave during a tow-surfing session just offshore of the small fishing village of Nazare, Portugal. An undersea canyon 5000 meters deep runs very close to the shore, and the unique bathymetry is known to create unusually large waves when west-northwest swells affect the coast. On Tuesday, an approaching cold front extending southwards from a low pressure system centered just south of Iceland generated strong winds off the coast of Portugal, and a west-northwest swell of 8 meters (26'). The canyon generated three big waves in excess of 60 feet that day, and McNamara was able to catch the tallest, 90-foot wave. The previous record highest wave surfed was a 77-foot (23 meter) wave caught in 2008 at Cortes Bank off the coast of Southern California by Mike Parsons.


Video 1. Surfer Garrett McNamara rides a 90-foot wave off the coast of Portugal on November 8, 2011, setting a new world record for the largest wave ever riden.

November 7 Tipton, Oklahoma tornado rated an EF-4
The powerful tornado that hit Tipton, Oklahoma on November 7 has been rated an EF-4 by the National Weather Service. The Tipton tornado hit two Oklahoma Mesonet stations and destroyed them; the Tipton mesonet site measured winds of 86.4 mph and the Fort Cobb site measured winds of 91.4 mph before destruction. The tornado was one of a family of six spawned that day by the parent supercell thunderstorm. The Tipton tornado is the first November EF-4 tornado in Oklahoma's history, and one of only twenty EF-4 or stronger November tornadoes observed in the U.S. since 1950, according to the Tornado History Project. There have been twelve December EF-4 tornadoes and two December EF-5 tornadoes observed in the U.S. since 1950. The confirmed tornado count for 2011 is 1543, putting this year in third place so far for most tornadoes, behind the 1692 tornadoes observed in 2004 and 1817 tornadoes in 2008. By the time the year ends, 2011 should wind up with 1600 - 1700 confirmed tornadoes.


Figure 2. Time series showing the weather at the Fort Cobb, OK mesonet station during passage of the November 7, 2011 Tipton tornado. A wind gust of 91.4 mph and pressure spike down to 946 mb occurred during the tornado's passage. Image credit: NWS/Norman Oklahoma.

Have a great weekend, everyone, and I'll be back Monday with a new post.

Jeff Masters

Southwest Oklahoma Chase 11-7-11 (strmchsr77)
This is the Tipton-Snyder, OK tornado. This supercell produced multiple tornadoes over a couple of hours.
Southwest Oklahoma Chase 11-7-11
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Think about what if that actually happened...


I don't think that's physically possible. The tropical ocean would get so cold that it no longer exists.
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

Finally someone in the blog who hasn't been infected by space-cow madness. XD
Anyways, I'm off to bed, Good Night everyone. Hopefully there won't be any more Space-Cow related posts when I get back here tomorrow.

lol....

You'll see Space Cows in bed tonight.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Quoting cyclonekid:

Finally someone in the blog who hasn't been infected by space-cow madness. XD
Anyways, I'm off to bed, Good Night everyone. Hopefully there won't be any more Space-Cow related posts when I get back here tomorrow.
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you guys are some kinda crazy tonight :)... 100 kmh winds today here.
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

Relevant.
How are we still talking about Space Cows?
This blog is so weird when there are no storms around.

n0 th@t's @st0n@u7 c0w
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Quoting Articuno:

I R SPACE COW!!!!!!!!!!!!1111111
M000000000!1

Relevant.
How are we still talking about Space Cows?
This blog is so weird when there are no storms around.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

How do you know? Maybe he was bitten by a spider and has acquired a superior intellect compared to normal dogs?

You never know...In fact, for all we know, he's a Space Cow.

I R SPACE COW!!!!!!!!!!!!1111111
M000000000!1
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

How do you know? Maybe he was bitten by a spider and has acquired a superior intellect compared to normal dogs?

You never know...In fact, for all we know, he's a Space Cow.

LOL That's hilarious.
Also, that's the most WTF comment of the year. Congratulations.
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Quoting Articuno:

He's not a dog...

How do you know? Maybe he was bitten by a spider and has acquired a superior intellect compared to normal dogs?

You never know...In fact, for all we know, he's a Space Cow.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

It's not like I have bad grades or anything, I just like making people laugh XD
And, Sean has died. Finally.
...SEAN HAS MERGED WITH A COLD FRONT...THIS IS THE LAST ADVISORY...
11:00 PM AST Fri Nov 11
Location: 36.7°N 57.7°W
Max sustained: 40 mph
Moving: ENE at 35 mph
Min pressure: 1000 mb

I like making people laugh, it's just I can't do it. :/
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Bad WNPR!

It's not like I have bad grades or anything, I just like making people laugh XD
And, Sean has died. Finally.
...SEAN HAS MERGED WITH A COLD FRONT...THIS IS THE LAST ADVISORY...
11:00 PM AST Fri Nov 11
Location: 36.7°N 57.7°W
Max sustained: 40 mph
Moving: ENE at 35 mph
Min pressure: 1000 mb
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Bad WNPR!

He's not a dog...
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

LOL, yeah, I guess you would say so.

Bad WNPR!
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Quoting Articuno:

At your school are you the class clown or no

LOL, yeah, I guess you would say so.
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

The NHC would explode. Literally.
We'd have to move to the Moon, and raise space-cows.

At your school are you the class clown or no
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

The NHC would explode. Literally.
We'd have to move to the Moon, and raise space-cows.

LOL!

You're killing me here, WNPR...
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

The NHC would explode. Literally.
We'd have to move to the Moon, and raise space-cows.

ROFLMBO!
space cows!
you made my day
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Think about what if that actually happened...

The NHC would explode. Literally.
We'd have to move to the Moon, and raise space-cows.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Think about what if that actually happened...

cat 5 nyc
hurricane some how hits ca as a major
lol
u continue
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

Fine, bring it.
>9,000 storms
>9,000 hurricanes
>9,000 major hurricanes
lol

Think about what if that actually happened...
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Wrong sir! Next year is 2012!

Fine, bring it.
>9,000 storms
>9,000 hurricanes
>9,000 major hurricanes
lol
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Wrong sir! Next year is 2012!

DOOMSDAY
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

Above average, not as active as 2010 or 2011, more like 2004 in terms of named storms.

Wrong sir! Next year is 2012!
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
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Quoting Ameister12:
Any predictions on what could be in store for 2012's hurricane season?

Above average, not as active as 2010 or 2011, more like 2004 in terms of named storms.
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Quoting WeatherNerdPR:

650 million years in under 2 minutes
This is rather interesting as well, showing Earth from 400 mya to 250 million years from now. It follows the Supercontinent cycle, but I wonder if it will actually end up like that.


Yes, seen such animations before, I just thought the ones I linked above were a bit more impressive as you can better picture the scale of the continents as well as their location.

For example, take the Appalachians in the eastern US. Not only are they very old (near 500 million years) formed in a collision with Africa and Europe, that collision was in the southern hemisphere. Pretty cool.

Yeah, nobody knows for sure when the next megacontinent will arrive (after all, Eurasia is a supercontinent in its own right), though it's guessed to be 200 to 250 million years in the future, but it'll be sure different to now.
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Quoting Ameister12:
Any predictions on what could be in store for 2012's hurricane season?

Above average.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I highly doubt it.

Go check the models. :)


I check the models quite frequently. I've seen my fair share of systems dropped on the models this year too, and quite a few that developed regardless. Weak subtropical development is possible late next week.
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Any predictions on what could be in store for 2012's hurricane season?
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Quoting Cotillion:
Something cool I ran across the other day:

A series of two minute animations based on estimations of how the Earth once looked, accompanied by soothing piano.

In the early Paleogene, 65 mya
(Could also call it the very late Cretaceous.)

In the early Triassic, 240 mya

In the middle Cambrian, 500 mya

In the middle Cyrogenian, 750 mya

Fascinating. Obviously, the weather patterns are very different than shown (you'd think, 'course we've no real idea) and the climate is not necessarily dead on (the Cyrogenian is believed to have been very cold, possibly in a 'snowball Earth' at the time). But, you get the picture.

The climate in each of these would be radically different on the whole. Imagine the hurricane seasons?

As you may note, particularly when you go far back, the continents are almost unrecognisable. The furthest north point on the Cambrian map is supposed to be... Australia (with a heavy southern hemisphere bias in land. Quite the opposite to today, don't you think?)

650 million years in under 2 minutes
This is rather interesting as well, showing Earth from 400 mya to 250 million years from now. It follows the Supercontinent cycle, but I wonder if it will actually end up like that.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I looked for video footage of the previous record for the highest wave ever surfed. Couldn't find it.

But I found the footage from the record before the record before the new record!

This wave is only 72 feet tall but seems more majestic somehow.



Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8801
Quoting CybrTeddy:
Afternoon all, Sean is gone. Was it our last? We'll shall see. Could get Tammy Post-season, but its possible that this season is done.

I highly doubt it.

Go check the models. :)
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Afternoon all, Sean is gone. Was it our last? We'll shall see. Could get Tammy Post-season, but its possible that this season is done.
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hey stormpetrol I think we need to watch that area in the SW Carib you and I know that storm still can form in Nov and some can be powerful so yeah I'm watching
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Alaska Superstorm 2.0 is down to 959 mbar.

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Hmm...
Everybody's talking about their height;
I'm 5'3" also
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Alaska Superstorm 2.0 is down to 959 mbar.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
Something cool I ran across the other day:

A series of two minute animations based on estimations of how the Earth once looked, accompanied by soothing piano.

In the early Paleogene, 65 mya
(Could also call it the very late Cretaceous.)

In the early Triassic, 240 mya

In the middle Cambrian, 500 mya

In the middle Cyrogenian, 750 mya

Fascinating. Obviously, the weather patterns are very different than shown (you'd think, 'course we've no real idea) and the climate is not necessarily dead on (the Cyrogenian is believed to have been very cold, possibly in a 'snowball Earth' at the time). But, you get the picture.

The climate in each of these would be radically different on the whole. Imagine the hurricane seasons?

As you may note, particularly when you go far back, the continents are almost unrecognisable. The furthest north point on the Cambrian map is supposed to be... Australia (with a heavy southern hemisphere bias in land. Quite the opposite to today, don't you think?)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Articuno:

I am at least 5.0-5.2" and I am 12.. lol..
It seems like they shot up overnight. Cold front over Cayman making the weather bleaky.
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I've been 6'2" since I was 13. I guess I just prove how different puberty is for everyone.

Then again I wasn't 13 all that long ago, and I'll probably grow 1-2 more inches until puberty finishes.
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51% 0.00in 564 watts/m^2
13:50 49.1 F - 31.3 F 29.90in WNW 6.0mph 15.0mph
windy cold day today, the highest it got was 49.1 degrees
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Quoting Grothar:


Don't worry, Tropical. I made it to 6' 1". Now I am back to 5' 3".

Lol!
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I'm not "short", I'm "fun-sized" :P


Don't worry, Tropical. I made it to 6' 1". Now I am back to 5' 3".
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 27059
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
.

.
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Quoting stormwatcherCI:
Both of my sons were about 5'2" at age 15 and now are 5'10' and 5'11".

I am at least 5.0-5.2" and I am 12.. lol..
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Yes, I am 5'3".
Both of my sons were about 5'2" at age 15 and now are 5'10' and 5'11".
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

1.) The windspeeds are in knots, so 35 knots = 40 mph.

2.) PT = post-tropical


...
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.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32684
.
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Sean has left the building:

AL, 19, 2011111200, , BEST, 0, 359N, 594W, 35, 1000, PT, 34, NEQ, 150, 120, 0, 0, 1004, 160, 60, 0, 0, L, 0, , 0, 0, SEAN, D,

And just to catch up:
Chrome 16.0.912.36 beta-m
6'2"
64.F
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.