Rare Japanese tornado kills 1, injures 48

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:28 PM GMT on May 07, 2012

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A rare strong tornado ripped through Ibaraki Prefecture in eastern Japan 30 miles northeast of Tokyo on Sunday, killing a teenage boy, injuring 48 people, and damaging or destroying 890 buildings. The tornado carved a path of destruction 15 km long and 500 meters wide, said the Japan Meteorological Agency. The tornado was given a preliminary rating of F-2, with winds of 113 - 157 mph (Japan uses the traditional "F" scale to rate tornadoes, not the "EF" scale used in the U.S.) The tornado also damaged homes in a housing complex in Tsukuba where 20 people from seven families from Fukushima Prefecture had evacuated following the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, caused by the earthquake and tsunami of March 2011. I bet those families are feeling disaster-prone!


Video 1. A rare tornado in Japan hits approximately 30 miles northeast of Tokyo on May 6, 2012.

Japan's tornado climatology
Tornadoes are rare in Japan, due to the fact the nation is surrounded by ocean, which tends to stabilize the air. Between 1961 - 2010, an average of 15 tornadoes per year hit Japan, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency. Only four F-3 tornadoes have hit Japan. The most recent F-3 hit on November 7, 2006, in the Wakasa area of Saroma, Hokkaido. Nine people died and 26 were injured. Over 30 buildings, including a dwelling, warehouses and temporary structures were damaged or destroyed. No violent F-4 or F-5 tornadoes have been recorded in Japan, according the Japan Meteorological Agency, though other sources list a December, 1990 tornado as having been an F-4. Wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt has more details in his latest post, Deadliest Tornadoes. Only one F-2 tornado hit Japan in both 2010 and 2011. A 1997 study published in the Journal of Climate found that Japanese tornadoes occurred most frequently in September and least frequently in March, and that typhoons were responsible for about 20% of all the tornadoes. A list of Asian tornado outbreaks maintained at Wikipedia lists the deadliest Japanese tornado as one on 6 September, 1881, which killed 16 people.


Figure 1. Distribution of tornadoes in Japan, 1961 - 2010. Image credit: Japan Meteorological Agency.

Jeff Masters

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Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8320
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

About 10-20 knots according to the GFS. Not bad for an early season tropical cyclone.
I hope this link works. It shows an interesting pattern change as low pressure is literally forced into the Caribbean. I still believe shear will be higher the ten to twenty when this occurs....Link
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21751
652. MTWX
Popcorn storms starting to fire across North MS... Bring on the rain!!! Link
Member Since: July 20, 2009 Posts: 23 Comments: 1393
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

About 10-20 knots according to the GFS. Not bad for an early season tropical cyclone.


That's really low for this early
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Quoting hydrus:
I believe shear will be present at the time this system is forecast to develop..just my opinion.

About 10-20 knots according to the GFS. Not bad for an early season tropical cyclone.
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Quoting DavidHOUTX:


That is very true. I am starting to wonder if the big mass of rain west of Houston will make it here before breaking apart into scattered light rain. There is plenty of sunshine left so we will just have to see


rule of thumb, ifthe sun stays out past three its almost garunteed
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weatherh98:


it wont move much tho


That is very true. I am starting to wonder if the big mass of rain west of Houston will make it here before breaking apart into scattered light rain. There is plenty of sunshine left so we will just have to see
Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 635
Quoting DavidHOUTX:


Well the Sea breeze is exploding along the coast in the form of a line!


it wont move much tho
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Quoting RitaEvac:
Line aint happening, chaos rain over TX, unorganized scattered, can't be predicted what's gonna happen


Well the Sea breeze is exploding along the coast in the form of a line!
Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 635


Hey, a Blob is a Blob....
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
I think JTWC gave up on 19s a little too quickly...


Yeah, maybe...it's not looking bad at the moment
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8320
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Nah, I think it would be of tropical origins. Sea Surface Temperatures are definitely warm enough to support a tropical system.
I believe shear will be present at the time this system is forecast to develop..just my opinion.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21751
I think JTWC gave up on 19s a little too quickly...

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Quoting jeffs713:

No, I think NEFL is actually of the species Trollicus Weblogus. This species is known for creating strife on blogs, and is closely related to Trollicus Forumi, and Trollicus Pranksterus. In short, they think its funny to cause grief, when it really isn't (to most).

They can be effectively exterminated with a quick spray of Troll-B-Gon or Troll-Away (available at a choice retailer near you). Alternatively, specially trained individuals can permanently eliminate them with judicious use of the Banhammer (please note, the Banhammer is only to be used by well-trained indviduals).


L
O
L
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jeffs713:

No, I think NEFL is actually of the species Trollicus Weblogus. This species is known for creating strife on blogs, and is closely related to Trollicus Forumi, and Trollicus Pranksterus. In short, they think its funny to cause grief, when it really isn't (to most).

They can be effectively exterminated with a quick spray of Troll-B-Gon or Troll-Away (available at a choice retailer near you).


hes not too trolly.
He is just argumenticus fightiae
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 9737
Line aint happening, chaos rain over TX, unorganized scattered, can't be predicted what's gonna happen
Member Since: July 14, 2008 Posts: 1 Comments: 9648
Quoting nigel20:

Are you related to Jamaicans? "no problem Rasta" is something that you usually hear from Jamaicans

No, I think NEFL is actually of the species Trollicus Weblogus. This species is known for creating strife on blogs, and is closely related to Trollicus Forumi, and Trollicus Pranksterus. In short, they think its funny to cause grief, when it really isn't (to most).

They can be effectively exterminated with a quick spray of Troll-B-Gon or Troll-Away (available at a choice retailer near you). Alternatively, specially trained individuals can permanently eliminate them with judicious use of the Banhammer (please note, the Banhammer is only to be used by well-trained indviduals).
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
Quoting NEFL:


No problem Rasta :-) move along :0)

Anyways, its still not set in stone that we'll be seeing El Nino, it could very well just be Neutral this summer. Models are just that, models, time will tell.


Are you related to Jamaicans? "no problem Rasta" is something that you usually hear from Jamaicans
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8320
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

As it should. The SOI goes through rises and falls, and that is completely normal. The next time we go back down, it should end up lower than the value it was at before it started going back up yesterday.

Up --> Down --> Farther Down --> Up --> Down --> Up --> Farther Down


I see
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Quoting PedleyCA:


Not much, was going bust on bad spelling but I caught myself (kind of)..
How are you this fine (so far) day. Weather good there?

Yeah, i'm good. It's currently partly cloudy with no present treat of rain.
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8320
Quoting weatherh98:


Soi is going back up...

(as of yesterday)

As it should. The SOI goes through rises and falls, and that is completely normal. The next time we go back down, it should end up lower than the value it was at before it started going back up yesterday.

Up --> Down --> Farther Down --> Up --> Down --> Up --> Farther Down
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Low pressure forecast in the favored areas like Levi has been eluding too.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21751
Quoting NEFL:


No problem Rasta :-) move along :0)

Anyways, its still not set in stone that we'll be seeing El Nino, it could very well just be Neutral this summer. Models are just that, models, time will tell.



Soi is going back up...

(as of yesterday)
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

78F with a dewpoint of 55F.


Wanna Trade?!?!?!
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Quoting nigel20:

Hey pedley. What's up?


Not much, was going bust on bad spelling but I caught myself (kind of)..
How are you this fine (so far) day. Weather good there?
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Quoting ncstorm:


My apologies, i dont remember the names of counties only parishes

it would be like you tying to remember tangipahoa parish or terrebonne parish, maybe even, vermilion parish:)
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NCEP


CMC
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Quoting PedleyCA:


.

Hey pedley. What's up?
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8320
And by looking at this, it would likely track W or W-NW. That Bermuda High is showing up nice on the long range..Edit..I realize it is closer to the Azores, but you can see Bermuda is under its influence.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21751
Quoting weatherh98:


Whats the temp?

Here its not so much the heat its the humidity, the dewpoint is 72!!

78F with a dewpoint of 55F.
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Quoting weatherh98:


It would be funny if thats where he lives

Nah, he's stated many times where he lives..he isnt in NH County
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Nope, I live in the county north.

Anyways, I'll be glad when it pours down rain tomorrow. It's too warm.


Whats the temp?

Here its not so much the heat its the humidity, the dewpoint is 72!!
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Quoting weatherh98:


Active early and then taporing off as we had into el nino


.
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Quoting jeffs713:

Nah, TAwx13 is legit. I wish my school (WAAAAAAAY back in the day) allowed us out on half days for election day.

(for those interested, Google is awesome)


Hahahahahah YeA I didnt question cody's legitamacy, I wish i got a day off also, but no im just sick!

Where do you live?
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Quoting weatherh98:


It would be funny if thats where he lives

Nope, I live in the county north.

Anyways, I'll be glad when it pours down rain tomorrow. It's too warm.
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Quoting weatherh98:


It would be funny if thats where he lives

Nah, TAwx13 is legit. I wish my school (WAAAAAAAY back in the day) allowed us out on half days for election day.

(for those interested, Google is awesome)
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
Quoting ncstorm:


yeah thats what Im thinking..New Hanover County had a full day


It would be funny if thats where he lives
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Quoting bohonkweatherman:
Since we are currently not in a La Nina or El Nino situation could we have a early active tropical season?


The movement towards El Nino usually supports an early start, but becoming less active than normal during the peak of the season. In general, this year should be below the post-1995 normal for Atlantic activity.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Really? Maybe it is just our district then.


yeah thats what Im thinking..New Hanover County had a full day
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Quoting ncstorm:


Really, cause my kids are still in school?



Caught red handed!!
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Quoting ncstorm:


Really, cause my kids are still in school?

Really? Maybe it is just our district then.
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It looks like SE TX has had enough warming to help storm chances this afternoon. Per the SPC maps, SBCIN is basically gone, and CAPE is slowly rising (instead of being consistently below 1000, its now running 500-1500). The Lifted Index and humidity level still stinks, tho. (Precipitable water is between 1.3 and 1.5")
Member Since: August 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5890
Quoting NEFL:


Oh Jeffy, you know the ban hammer well dont you since you have gotten it several times! But its okay, i'm really glad you picked up that 3.54" of rain yesterday! Any today? I was thinking you may get 4-8" today, let me know :-) I understand now from Neapolitan that 70% means that its not 100% going to rain so if it doesnt rain then the meteorologists werent technically wrong! Anyways, i bet you can smell the rainy season its so close!


Let me nip this now and this is it with you as this is no place for this non-sense. I am not Jeff as you state and if you have a problem then e-mail me.
Member Since: October 26, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2651
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

The 06Z GFS showed tropical development in the East Pacific but the 12Z just shows an area of low pressure.

Thanks much TAwx13
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8320
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Oh don't worry, I'm not. ;)

North Carolina primaries are today so all schools get a half-day.


Really, cause my kids are still in school?
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Quoting nigel20:

Hey TAwx13. Are the models still hinting on developement in the eastern pacific?

The 06Z GFS showed tropical development in the East Pacific but the 12Z just shows an area of low pressure.
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From the 0z run of the ensemble, all of the little closed red loops (5760m isohypse) in the eastern Pacific at 14 days out represented forecasted locations of a tropical cyclone there. The following 6z run shifted all of the action into the western Caribbean before the EPAC could get a storm, but as these situations usually go, the EPAC will get activity and possibly a storm first before the Caribbean lights up.

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86 and no pop ups yet? woah:)
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.